Julian Lampert was among the artists featured in the recent book "Empowering Outperformance"—written by the Belgian arctic expeditionist and filmmaker Dixie Dansercoer.  

2017 saw the world premiere of Julian's Quintet for Flute and String Quartet, given by the Borromeo String Quartet with flutist Jelle Atema and the Cape Cod International Music Festival. This quintet also featured for the first time in concert performance two prehistoric flutes discovered by Prof. Ivan Turk in Slovenia, and reconstructed from their original materials by Mr. Atema—an interdisciplinary project featured at the New York Museum of Natural History, NPR, and WGBH Radio networks.  

In 2016, Julian's soundtrack to the short-film comedy "Goddesses in The Loo" (New York—directed by Jenilyn Rodriguez) was recorded at Galaxy Studios of Belgium. 
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Born in Russia with Polish and French origins, Julian Lampert immigrated as a boy with his family to the United States and settled in Boston in the 1990's where he was raised and educated.
He inherited the Russian and European music traditions from his mother, Prof. Elena Lampert (Moscow Conservatory)—his principal teacher of piano and harmony.
Julian also studied with professors Dorothy Taubman and Eliza Hansen who selected him a series of master courses in Hamburg.  

Julian's composition career began with Ludmila Belousova & Oleg Protopopov, the gold-medalist Olympic Figure-Skating legends; Julian composed for their performance tours and documentary films.

His skills within film music spans four centuries of musical eras—from Renaissance/Baroque/Classical/Romantic genres, to the most modern developments within jazz, latin, and world music. Julian has scored three documentaries and a short-film comedy. 

After his debut in Pittsburgh in 1999, Julian met Fred Rogers—creator of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. During their subsequent friendship, Mr. Rogers inspired Julian to write music for children; this resulted in Julian's album "Minimoods for Children". Much of this music was often featured in the Music & Art workshops conducted by his mother, who founded the Lampert Center for Arts & Culture in Boston and New York.

As Performer:

At 13, Julian gave his orchestral debut as soloist with conductor Roman Totenberg, and later with Victor Rosenbaum, both in Cambridge Massachusetts. This brought him to the attention of Richard Probst—former Director of Concerts & Artists at Steinway and Vice President of Harold Shaw Concerts.  Julian also received guidance from Shura Cherkassky and Rudolf Serkin. Under Mr. Probst's auspices, Julian performed extensively throughout the United States, Western & Eastern Europe.
Performances include:

  • Marlboro Music Festival
  • The Scotia Festival of Canada—directed by Pierre Boulez
  • Amherst College; Harpsichordist and pianist with Amherst's Bach Festival Orchestra conducted by Blanche Moyse
  • Columban Center for the Arts—Belgium
  • Recitals at the Hall of the Kosciuzko Foundation of New York in festivals directed by David Dubal—broadcaster and Juilliard professor
  • New York concerto debut: Beethoven's Fourth Concerto with the Symphony of Westchester—Barry Charles Hoffman, conductor
  • Bendheim Performing Arts Center—New York
  • Diamond Chateau—Presidential Palace, St. Martin, by invitation of First Lady Josianne Fleming
  • Harvard University—Paine Hall
  • French Cultural Institute & Library of Boston
  • Woods Hole Music Festival—Cape Cod summer series
  • Concert Series of DuQuesne University—Pittsburgh
  • Russia: The Scriabin Museum, The Gnessin Academy, Moscow State University
  • Biarritz Music Festival at The Regina—France
  • Miremonde Arts Concert Series, in performance with the Kopelman String Quartet—New York

Radio/television appearances include WGBH Boston; WCVB Boston; WQED Pittsburgh; and News-12; New York.